Reboot Podcast Episode #23 – With a Little More Care – Entrepreneur Growth & Development – with Sherman Lee

The Reboot podcast showcases the heart and soul, the wins and losses, the ups and downs of startup leadership. On the show, Entrepreneurs, CEO’s, and Startup Leaders discuss with Jerry Colonna the emotional and psychological challenges they face daily as leaders.

Episode 23 // September 11, 2015

With a little more care, a little more courage, and, above all, a little more soul, our lives can be so easily discovered and celebrated in work, and not, as now, squandered and lost in its shadow.

Guests

Sherman Lee

Sherman Lee

Co-Founder and CEO, Good Audience

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Episode Description

Entrepreneur growth and development

We spend so much time looking at where we aren’t or where others have gone that we don’t fully appreciate where we are and how much we’ve grown on the journey. As entrepreneurs, we can get so lost on what is needed to be done, that we fail to recognize how much we can grow and develop over time.  

A year ago today, Reboot didn’t have a podcast.  A year ago today, Sherman Lee was staring down a draining bank account, a shaky business model, and a crippling fear: if I fail, I won’t be able to provide.  A year later we sit with our 23rd podcast episode, a return visit from Sherman one of our first guests, and an opportunity to appreciate Sherman’s growth and development since we last spoke.  

Sherman Lee on Twitter

Show Highlights

“It is so fucking exhausting to fake it.” @jerrycolonna Click To Tweet

“There were many many times where we wondered if we were even fit to be entrepreneurs.” @SHERM8N Click To Tweet The only way to build a real business is to build a business. It’s that simple, and that hard. Click To Tweet

“Last year my biggest fear was running out of money, and how to feed our families. That fear is completely gone now.” Sherman Lee

“Some people like to use the word “story” for things we tell ourselves, but Jerry likes to use the word “myth” because the delusions we tell ourselves serve an emotional purpose.”  Jerry Colonna

“There were many many times where we wondered if we were even fit to be entrepreneurs.” Sherman Lee

“My grandfather was an entrepreneur and lived by a simple rule, which was, at the end of the day you have more money in the bank than you did at the beginning of the day.”Jerry Colonna

“There were plenty of times when we doubted ourselves and wondered if we were actually providing value.” Sherman Lee

“One of the things I admire most about the engineering mindset is that they have been trained to take data and ascertain what the next step is.” Jerry Colonna

“There’s a difference between failed experiments and failure.” Jerry Colonna

“The world is always going to be giving you data, and some of it will conflict with other data.” Jerry Colonna

“It’s not going to be smooth sailing from here, but I know we will never go out of business.” Sherman Lee

“Fundraising does not mean success.” Sherman Lee

“Success is waking up today and having more money than you did yesterday.”  Jerry Colonna

“Success is gainfully employing people.” Jerry Colonna

“Success is having a company that is in alignment with your values as a human being.” Jerry Colonna

“We thought we had to raise money to be a successful company.” Sherman Lee

“We start a business so that the business can be an expression of who we are.” Jerry Colonna

“After going through the fundraising process I didn’t even want to wake up in the morning.” Sherman Lee

“We wanted the world to hold us accountable.” Sherman Lee

“There are tons of startups that raise millions of dollars, and they are making nothing every month.” Sherman Lee

“It is so fucking exhausting to fake it.” Jerry Colonna

“Our employees trust us because we are transparent.” Sherman Lee

“Our customers trust us because they can see our numbers, and understand that we won’t go out of business.” Sherman Lee

“We all want to work with people that we trust because that’s community.” Jerry Colonna

“The only way to build a real business is to build a business. It’s that simple, and that hard.” Jerry Colonna